5 negotiation mistakes you must avoid in a client meeting

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The key to succeed in client meetings is to never get caught in any whirlpool of emotions. No matter how daunting the agenda is or how improbable the topics of discussion are, there is always a chance to win the approval of your clients when you are crystal clear in your objectives. The moral imperative is to chalk out all the possible negotiation strategies to effectively handle the hustle and bustle. Here are the five negotiation mistakes you must avoid in any client meeting:

Fallacies in your Preparation

As I mentioned in one of my previous write-ups, by failing to prepare you are indeed preparing to fail. Despite having crystal clear objectives, it is important to rehearse your arguments. Otherwise, your negotiation skills go for a toss. To obviate such absurd consequences, it is suggested to practice using role play. Ensure that you do not compromise on your moot-able points.  If there are any fatal flaws in your preparation, get corrected and learn from your mistakes.image-1

Beating around the bush

Remember, the most important point is to make the client meeting a match in heaven. So, project your views and pitch your points. Do not circumvent or dodge any issue. Get your points clear. Do not try to play with the emotions of the client(s) by talking about his character. Rather debate and discuss. If there is any dissent, accept it graciously with a disarming smile.

Red herring

This is the most illogical and fallacious way of coming to a conclusion which is deemed logical but is in-fact ‘the most illogical’ conclusion. Red herring is all about coming to a wrong conclusion with correct clues. For example, if I say, Steve is a cool guy and all cool guys are cheerful, you can easily arrive at a logical conclusion that Steve is cheerful. Any other conclusion which makes no sense but appears to make sense is illogical. For example, if I say All cheerful guys are cool is profoundly illogical. Remember, clients are smart. So, act smart.

Not Building Relationships

The moment your client notices that you are indifferent to his concerns or an opinion, your battle is lost. It is important to build a rapport and strike a nice tandem with him. For example, if your client says that your company doesn’t pay attention to environmental concerns, do not contradict loudly. Eloquently substantiate with stats and facts how you have contributed and played a vital role in making the world a better place. Contradict pleasantly and win his heart with a smile.

Too much attention

Too much of anything will eventually result in nothing. Do not draw too much of attention. Keep your emotions in check. Also, do not give too much attention to clients as you may no longer be in a stronger bargaining position. Give only the needful.

Suggested Read: 3 strategies to work with a difficult customer

Avoid the aforementioned negotiation mistakes and emerge victorious.

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Raghavendra munches several 'entrepreneurship' facts throughout the day. A jack of all trades, Raghavendra dreamt of being 'scriptwriter of destiny' but ended up being a passionate author, philosopher, strategist and blogger. Donning so many hats, it is 'entrepreneurship' which gives him the kick. He finds solace in acquainting himself with present-day issues.

Raghavendra

Raghavendra munches several 'entrepreneurship' facts throughout the day. A jack of all trades, Raghavendra dreamt of being 'scriptwriter of destiny' but ended up being a passionate author, philosopher, strategist and blogger. Donning so many hats, it is 'entrepreneurship' which gives him the kick. He finds solace in acquainting himself with present-day issues.

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